Education

2015 CUE Rock Star Crescent City

My dad use to caution us, be careful what you wish for, you may just get it. Yesterday, Jon Corippo (Twitter) called me and asked if I was available to come be a faculty member at the CUE Rock Star camp in Crescent City, CA, during 12-14 August. Yes, in just two weeks. I told him yes. Jon and I have an interesting history. Our friendship started late last year when applications were for due for folks wanting to be faculty at any of the 2015 CUE Rock Star camps. I have more than a few friends that have been faculty in

Education / Military

Teachers & Mentors

One of my most rewarding experiences in the Army was the time I spent both as a mentor and as a protege. I am proud to say that many of those relationships continue on today, just as I am proud to say that I learned much about both being a mentor and protege, and about the art of the relationship, during my time in the service. It truly is a valuable tool to have and use during the course of any profession or career. But one of the things that drives me batty, in talking with teachers and others

Education

Teaching as a Profession – or not

I spend a lot of time talking with teachers and other educators, and invariably, in the course of doing so, we end up comparing and contrasting elements of my world – that of a former military officer and former career intelligence guy – with their world, that as teachers and educators.  And one thing that comes up, often, is the debate over whether teaching or even just educating is a profession.

Education

The Mixtape Project

This summer, I will drive west across America twice. The first time will be in early May, when I head to Portland (probably via Los Angeles) in order to spend 4-6 weeks setting up the new house and some job hunting. The second time will be in late July, when the family drive to Portland for good. Driving across America is a long, long drive. There’s no other way to put it. It’s pretty, there’s a lot to see and do, but damn, it’s a long drive. So, help me (and us) out – make us a mix tape.

Education

Moby Dick, edcamps, and workshops

As you know, I’m a parent and not a teacher. I’m also a recently retired Army officer, having spent a lot of my career as a member of various staffs, supporting commanders facing tough problems, trying to make life less dangerous for our units while we were in combat, and turning the unknown into the known or at least the understood. And as a parent, I am someone who is active in the discussions about education and education reform, but I am and will always most definitely be an outsider. But I am right there with you, in understanding

Education

On @Tritonkory

Today is the birthday of my Twitter peep, Kory Graham. To a lot of the world, and especially the Twitter-verse, she’s just TritonKory – named for her school. She’s a kindergarten teacher in Dodge Center, Minnesota, and has been a teacher now for, oh, about 20 years I guess. It’s a funny story, how she left New Jersey for college and adventure and fame and fortune, and found this awesome life in what she calls her tiny little town, where she is – in her eyes – a rock star to the 5 and 6 year old kids in

Education

Journeymen Teachers Need Room to Grow

As I leave the Army after a successful 20 year run, and make preparations to turn my efforts full time to education, it’s only natural that I see similarities and differences between the two fields. One area I have noticed a great many differences and similarities is in how both junior teachers and junior officers are brought into the fold. And until today, I had been happy to say that I thought that Army did a better job in being more forgiving with regard to performance of junior officers and masking – or hiding – their evaluations once they’ve

Education

Professional Development – It’s Not All About the Kids

My series on education, The Educationalist Papers, is looking at a series of interconnected topics that relate to leadership, personal and professional development, and coaching and mentoring within the education profession. Drawing on my time in the Army and my active engagement within the profession, I am working with teachers and educators to examine the strengths and challenges faced in education today, and what is needed in education reform. When talking with educators about professional development, one common sentiment I hear is that professional development is aimed at making you a better educator of kids, and that this is

Education

I wasn’t selected to present at #CUERockStar

On 22 December, I was notified that I was not selected as a presented for any of the CUE Rock Star camps scheduled for summer 2015. I had put together what I considered to be a pretty decent proposal, raising my hand to volunteer to come to California to moderate morning and afternoon sessions at one of any of a number of the three day camps. but alas, my services are not going to be needed. So, let’s talk about this.

Education

On Being A #Unicorn

I am a parent involved in education reform. I am on twitter (@artlaflamme), and I participate in education chats on twitter, in which I am often the only parent / non-teacher. I’ve been to two edcamps (), and at each one there was one other parent / non-teacher (although one was the head of a PTA.) People ask me what the hell am I doing, wandering into all of this. I tell them to treat me like they would a unicorn at a buffet: assume the unicorn knows what it’s doing, and go back to your own business. Because

Education

Professional Development: Books that matter

The New York Times has its list out now, and the list includes three books on education. I read a lot, though it’s often online and often things like the BBC, Reuters and al-Jazeera wire service feeds directly. But I do try to find balance in the books that I read, between books that I want to read and books that I should read. These three books are ones that I should read.

Education

A Call to Arms: Mentors & Coaches

This is Erin Stevenson (@MrsStevensonSS). I am suppose to say that she is a fairly typical 2nd year high school social studies teacher, only she’s not. She came to teaching later in life, after trials and tribulations, and finding herself. And I am also suppose to say that she is fairly typical, in that after having had an assigned “mentor” for her first year of teaching, she’s now going it alone during this, her second year in front of students. I would venture to guess that, in this fall semester, she’s focused on not drowning, getting her lesson plans

Education

Professional Learning Networks: 300 vs 3000

If you’re not on twitter, or never played on twitter, this post won’t do much for you. I’d recommend you skip it. Really. I’m writing it with the assumption that you know how twitter works, as a user. The ridiculously funny Justin (@SchleiderJustin), the always thought provoking Rusul (@RusulAlrubail) and I were talking about managing our Twitter feeds, and it has exploded as Justin kicked off his week-long #slowchatPE discussion involving many other people. He asked, “How do you keep your PLN small enough to have personal contact but large enough to learn?”