Education

ISTE2016: Why connections still matter

I am in Denver, attending the annual International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference, known as ISTE2016. It’s a tech conference, through and through. But with 18,000 educators – mostly teachers – important to not overlook one key part of events like ISTE2016 – the needs to network and make connections as a part of personal and professional development, in lieu of looking for a gadget or widget as being some magic bullet.

Education

Back to School: Engaging Parents

A few weeks ago, I was faculty at the CUE Rockstar event in Crescent City. Last week, I attended the #edcamp here in Portland, #edcampPDX. At both places, I talked with teachers about better ways to engage parents, based on the techniques we use in the Army, but I also talked about tools teachers can use in better engaging parents. And since school has actually started in many places, to include our own school district, I should probably share some of those ideas here as well. Here they are: Some tools to consider, when changing how you engage parents

Education / Military

Teachers & Mentors

One of my most rewarding experiences in the Army was the time I spent both as a mentor and as a protege. I am proud to say that many of those relationships continue on today, just as I am proud to say that I learned much about both being a mentor and protege, and about the art of the relationship, during my time in the service. It truly is a valuable tool to have and use during the course of any profession or career. But one of the things that drives me batty, in talking with teachers and others

Education

Teaching as a Profession – or not

I spend a lot of time talking with teachers and other educators, and invariably, in the course of doing so, we end up comparing and contrasting elements of my world – that of a former military officer and former career intelligence guy – with their world, that as teachers and educators.  And one thing that comes up, often, is the debate over whether teaching or even just educating is a profession.

Education

Moby Dick, edcamps, and workshops

As you know, I’m a parent and not a teacher. I’m also a recently retired Army officer, having spent a lot of my career as a member of various staffs, supporting commanders facing tough problems, trying to make life less dangerous for our units while we were in combat, and turning the unknown into the known or at least the understood. And as a parent, I am someone who is active in the discussions about education and education reform, but I am and will always most definitely be an outsider. But I am right there with you, in understanding

Education

Journeymen Teachers Need Room to Grow

As I leave the Army after a successful 20 year run, and make preparations to turn my efforts full time to education, it’s only natural that I see similarities and differences between the two fields. One area I have noticed a great many differences and similarities is in how both junior teachers and junior officers are brought into the fold. And until today, I had been happy to say that I thought that Army did a better job in being more forgiving with regard to performance of junior officers and masking – or hiding – their evaluations once they’ve

Education

Professional Development – It’s Not All About the Kids

My series on education, The Educationalist Papers, is looking at a series of interconnected topics that relate to leadership, personal and professional development, and coaching and mentoring within the education profession. Drawing on my time in the Army and my active engagement within the profession, I am working with teachers and educators to examine the strengths and challenges faced in education today, and what is needed in education reform. When talking with educators about professional development, one common sentiment I hear is that professional development is aimed at making you a better educator of kids, and that this is

Education

On Being A #Unicorn

I am a parent involved in education reform. I am on twitter (@artlaflamme), and I participate in education chats on twitter, in which I am often the only parent / non-teacher. I’ve been to two edcamps (), and at each one there was one other parent / non-teacher (although one was the head of a PTA.) People ask me what the hell am I doing, wandering into all of this. I tell them to treat me like they would a unicorn at a buffet: assume the unicorn knows what it’s doing, and go back to your own business. Because

Education

Professional Development: Books that matter

The New York Times has its list out now, and the list includes three books on education. I read a lot, though it’s often online and often things like the BBC, Reuters and al-Jazeera wire service feeds directly. But I do try to find balance in the books that I read, between books that I want to read and books that I should read. These three books are ones that I should read.